I have loved this city

It was over 20 years ago I picked up a book that helped me understand how I was wired. The realization in my life at the time was I was wired for urban life. It wasn’t about “gentrification” or some nirvana feel of high end coffee shops and five star restaurants in proximity to billion dollar sports stadiums.

Continue reading “I have loved this city”

Reflections on a Murder One Block from My House

There was a shooting yesterday morning one block from my house. It was a party going late and a man was shot while sitting in his car across the street. Police know it wasn’t random.

There are several things swirling in my head as I process the thought of a murder one block away.
1. Murders happen. They happen in cities. They happen in suburbs. They happen in rural towns. It is awful each time and, as usual, the comments flow on Facebook and comment pages on news sites about how dangerous the city is.
That is simply just not truth. I have chosen to live in the city and raise three boys in the city and it is only a very rare occasion in 15 years I have had something this tragic happen this close.
When people point out “how dangerous” the city is, I love pointing out the murders happening in the suburbs and rural areas. Not because I love pointing out murders, but because it is necessary to keep things IN CONTEXT.
2. People blame the dumbest things when murder happens in a city.
3. I am not “brave” for living in a city.
4. I am not “trapped” in the city.
5. I am not stupid for living in the city.
6. As Joe Soucheray always says on “Garage Logic” (a local radio show): “Nothing good happens at 3 in the morning.”
7. I love my city and pray and live for its peace. I will continue to do so. That doesn’t make me “brave” or “holier than thou” or ANYTHING other than someone who wants to obey God right where he is, and I happen to think ALL of us should do the same: Obey God right where we are.
NE Mpls party shooting

Lost in Transition

We live with transition all around us. I live in an urban area, so change is part of what stays the same.

This morning I was taking the bus, so when I transfer I walk through the IDS tower crystal court, which is essentially the heart of Minneapolis. I’ve walked that route for months. As I looked at new businesses going in, I began to think about what they were replacing. I found I could remember what was in one storefront only a few months ago, but I couldn’t remember some other store fronts.

Things get lost in transition. Memories fade quickly. What we think is permanent gets replaced, and sometimes that memory fades in the collective conscious.

It causes me to work harder to reflect on my journey in a more purposeful manner. To remember events. To remember people. And not lose them in transition.