Book Review: Soul Care in African American Practice

Soul Care in African American Practice by Barbara Peacock

In the late 90s and early 2000s Renovare released some volumes on spiritual reading that were “workbook” based. One, Spiritual Classics, focused on readings for individuals and groups based on the 12 spiritual disciplines from Richard Foster’s classic, Celebration of Discipline. Another book was Devotional Classics based on Foster’s book, Streams of Living Water. They were designed to take individuals or groups through a slow process of learning from historic spiritual reading combined with Scripture and spiritual formation practices. I still have those volumes on my shelves. They are well-worn.

In that tradition and format comes Barbara Peacock’s book from Intervarsity Press, Soul Care in African American Practice.

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Book Review: The Myth of the American Dream by D.L. Mayfield

The Myth of the American Dream by D.L. Mayfield

For the past 3-4 years I have had a book on my heart to write. Not ever having done a writing project, and being deathly afraid of critiques, I took notes, blogged a bit, preached a series with the beginning ideas of the book, and generally avoided doing more.

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Book Review — "The Story Retold"

The Story Retold: A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament

G.K. Beal and Benjamin L. Gladd

Having taught Bible classes for 15 years in a college, THIS is the book I wish I had early on. The approach in this textbook is to keep the entire story in mind. We can’t be enamored with the New Testament because it is “easier” to read. We need to understand the world of the story of Israel in our Old Testament.

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Book Review: The End of Hunger

This book creates a big problem for me. There is so much to work through and think through it’s impossible to put it in a book review. This is a book for thought, for contemplation, for discussion, and then for action.

The book is edited by Jenney Eaton Dyer and Cathleen Falsani, but the feature is the articles by so many people involved in the issue of hunger, food insecurity, and the work to actually think of ending hunger by 2030.

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Book Review — Basic Christianity

InterVarsity Press is re-issuing some classics from their catalogue. Basic Christianity by John Stott is a standard. It is every bit a classic in the explanation of Christianity as Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis. Having read Stott’s book years ago, I took the opportunity to read it again.

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Book Review — Bread for the Resistance: 40 Devotionals for Justice People

Bread for the Resistance

  • Donna Barber

Donna Barber is cofounder of The Voices Project, an organization that influences culture through training and promoting leaders of color. Her work is dedicated to training up leader of color to step into key roles in the church and culture.

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Let’s talk about sex

Authentic Human Sexuality, 3rd Edition, by Judith K. Balswick and Jack O. Balswick

“Sex pervades our culture, going far beyond the confines of the bedroom into the workplace, the church, and the media. Yet despite all the attention and even obsession devoted to sex, human sexuality remains confusing and even foreboding. What, after all, is authentic human sexuality?”

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Book Review: I See You by Terence Lester

“Privilege has a way of blinding us to the realities faced by those society has made invisible, and in true incarnational fashion, Terence takes us with him on a journey to uncover the true experiences of our most vulnerable neighbors.” (Chad Wright-Pittman)

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Book Review — Becoming an Ordinary Mystic

The word “mystic” is about as useful as “monk” or “monastic” in many of our lives as believers. We may have an idea of what that word entails, but to become a “mystic” (or “monk” or “monastic”)? No thanks.

There are those who have gone before considered to be mystics who wrote of their experiences, or their experiences were given as accounts by someone else. In the Christian sense, when reading their writings, such as St. John of the Cross, we read those deep words and think, “Good for him. Not a calling for me!”

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