Why the horror of the crucifixion is needed

“In the final analysis, the crucifixion of Christ for the sin of he world reveals that it is not only the victims of oppression and injustice who are in need of God’s deliverance, but also the victimizers. Each of us is capable, under certain circumstances, of being a victimizer…

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Why we need to keep working past #MLKDay

Leading up to Martin Luther King Day is becoming more of a sacred habit for me. On MLK Day, as well, I will read “Letter from a Birmingham jail” just to kick my weak motivation into a higher gear. This year I was able to add in participating in MLK ceremonies.

And it’s not enough.

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God of the Oppressed

The scandal is that the gospel means liberation, that this liberation comes to the poor, and that it gives them the strength and the courage to break the conditions of servitude. This is what the Incarnation means. God in Christ comes to the weak and the helpless, and becomes one with them, taking their condition of oppression as his own and thus transforming their slave-existence into a liberated existence. — James Cone, God of the Oppressed  Continue reading “God of the Oppressed”

Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross

Here is the thing with Greg Boyd’s two-volume behemoth titled The Crucifixion of the Warrior God : it is like the never-ending story. I get through a chapter, which is fairly amazing in and of itself, and I think, “Whew!” Then I’m wondering how much farther to go… and I swear more chapters magically appear at the end of the volume. I’m not kidding. It always looks like I’ve read 10 pages at the front of the second volume even if I’ve read 5 chapters. (And Boyd doesn’t do short chapters like most publishers and readers insist on!) I’ll never finish this book.  Continue reading “Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross”