God of the Oppressed

The scandal is that the gospel means liberation, that this liberation comes to the poor, and that it gives them the strength and the courage to break the conditions of servitude. This is what the Incarnation means. God in Christ comes to the weak and the helpless, and becomes one with them, taking their condition of oppression as his own and thus transforming their slave-existence into a liberated existence. — James Cone, God of the Oppressed  Continue reading “God of the Oppressed”

Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross

Here is the thing with Greg Boyd’s two-volume behemoth titled The Crucifixion of the Warrior God : it is like the never-ending story. I get through a chapter, which is fairly amazing in and of itself, and I think, “Whew!” Then I’m wondering how much farther to go… and I swear more chapters magically appear at the end of the volume. I’m not kidding. It always looks like I’ve read 10 pages at the front of the second volume even if I’ve read 5 chapters. (And Boyd doesn’t do short chapters like most publishers and readers insist on!) I’ll never finish this book.  Continue reading “Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross”

The Old Testament God and Violence

“Contrary to the overly generalized and sensationalized description of the God of the OT provided by (other authors), people who read Scripture sympathetically generally find that the God of the OT is by-and-large a relational God of hesed (i.e., covenant-love) who continually strives to bring all people — first the Israelites, and then, through them, all the ‘families of the earth’ (Gen. 12:3; cf. Exod 19:5-6) — into relationships of shalom and covenant righteousness/justice with himself as well as with each other.” Greg Boyd, Crucifixion of the Warrior God