The work we still need to do

In reading the book The End of Hunger, there was the good news combined with the challenge. The good news was that a massive amount of work has been accomplished in the past 25 years. Severe hunger is being reduced statistically. The bad news is that the last bit to go to eliminate the issue by 2030 is still costly. We can’t let up. We have to stay focused and work harder. It is easier to cut a problem in half than to eliminate it.

I thought of this as I sat in a historic black Episcopal Church in Montgomery, Alabama this week. The subject wasn’t hunger. The subject was historic and systemic racism. The subject was justice.

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Kirk Franklin, Gospel Music, and being black in Christian music

Kirk Franklin gets right at the issues of race, justice, and the subtle difference between “Christian” music and “gospel” music. LISTEN.

Legalism is great

I am finding the Spirit calling me to walk a little more intentionally through the Gospel of Mark right now, so I have suspended my Daily Office reading for a season to see what the Lord wants to say to me in this gospel, which happens to be my favorite of the four.

Mark 7 is a powerful statement on legalism and prejudice.

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How race became a religion

I am a fan of the Holy Post podcast. Phil Vischer (Veggie Tales) has a great conversation with Skye Jethani and Christian Taylor in this episode. The first half is worth the listen (especially Christian talking about her documentary on France in WWII), but it’s the second half of the episode that is worth the listen… and, of course, challenging. Willie James Jennings is the guest and takes on racism as a religion.

I’d highly recommend his book The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race.

Anti-racist

I have been challenged recently by people who write on racism and friends who are people of color on this issue of racism. It is something that has weighed on me the past several years (the issue of racism) and when I moved to Alabama, I knew the Lord would keep working on me. The challenge is this: It’s not enough to simply think I’m not a racist. I need to be anti-racist.

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