We need the true prophetic voice again

“The prophets purge our imaginations of this world’s assumptions on how life is lived and what counts in life. Over and over again, God the Holy Spirit uses the prophets to separate his people from the cultures in which they live and to put them back on the path of simple faith and obedience and worship in defiance of all that the world admires and rewards.” — Eugene Peterson, As Kingfishers Catch Fire

We need the prophets again. Not only that, we need to pay attention once again.

The watchman on the wall

I am reading back through Ezekiel these days, asking the Lord about “imagination.”

As I read through the early part of Ezekiel again, I am struck by Ezekiel’s call. I also think of Jeremiah’s call. They were to warn clearly regardless of the response. If they didn’t give the warning, God would hold them (the prophets) accountable. In an era where church leaders are consumed with response, this is just offensive.  Continue reading “The watchman on the wall”

Turning bitter to sweet

In 2 Kings 2 there is the story of Elisha and the bitter water. There was a place where he lived and the water was poisonous. It was not safe. (Who knew Elisha visited Flint, Michigan?)

Elisha had the inquirers put salt into a jar and toss the salt into the water. The water became “sweet”, or life giving, again.

We may face situations that are poisonous. We face a tough work situation, family situation, church situation and the waters are poisonous. Nothing good is happening. The question becomes, “Can the bitter become sweet?”

It is easy to join the bitter. It is prophetic to turn the bitter into sweet.

This is not about ignoring the poison. It is about changing the poison. It takes a prophetic, Spirit-filled leader to bring that kind of change.

Be that kind of leader. 

KEYS:

  1. We must be deep in Christ. When we are deep in him, sweet “water” can flow from us. If we are not plunging the depths of Christ ourselves, the bitterness can infect us. We have two ways to grow: grow into bitterness, or grow into a sweet depth of Christ. It is easier to grow in bitterness if the sweet depth of Christ is not there first.
  2. Through the Spirit, we are enabled to see what is POSSIBLE. Elisha could see what was possible even though the presence situation was bad.
  3. Prophetic action may seem “salty” at times. I’m just using the picture from the story, but there are answers to turn a situation around that aren’t always “tasty.” Sometimes the prophetic action seems “salty,” or abrasive, or rude, or doesn’t correlate to the end result. But, the prophetic leader follows the lead of the Spirit, acts, and the result is life.

When we came to our current ministry 18 years ago, the waters weren’t “sweet.” Over the process we’ve seen the Lord turn possible bitterness into sweet waters of life. We’ve had to be “salty” at times as leaders. But as we’ve dug roots of ministry here, leadership has become so deep in Christ, there abides a life-giving element of leadership that pushes out all attempts of poison.

Life is possible. Change is possible. We don’t have to abide in bitterness. We don’t have to ignore the poisonous situation. We can bring the change needed.

Lord, give us ears to hear

One way (possibly) to express what the word of God means in full (besides getting so narrow to say it means only the Bible) is this passage in Amos:

9     On that day, says the Lord God,
I will make the sun go down at noon,
and I will darken the earth in broad daylight.
10 I will turn your feasts into sad affairs
and all your singing into a funeral song;
I will make people wear mourning clothes
and shave their heads;
I will make it like the loss of an only child,
and the end of it like a bitter day.
11 The days are surely coming, says the Lord God,
when I will send hunger and thirst on the land;
neither a hunger for bread, nor a thirst for water,
but of hearing the Lord ’s words.
12 They will wander from sea to sea,
and from north to east;
they will roam all around, seeking the Lord’s word,
but they won’t find it. (Amos 8:9-12)

The famine of the word isn’t about lacking a printed word. It’s about the Lord not speaking any longer. There isn’t a “fresh word” from God.

It’s not something in addition to the written word. It is the ability to hear God.

Lord, give us ears to hear! Let the written word be made alive by the Living Word! Without hearing the Living Word, the written word can be right in front of us and we are still blind! We could still be deaf!

Speak to us, Living Word. Let us hear your word to the Church today!

 

Living in the Current Anointing of God

In reading through the story of Elisha I am struck by the ease with which Elisha moves in each situation. The miraculous pours from him. He has not looked back since he struck the Jordan River with Elijah’s cloak.

There is almost the mundane situation of having the stew taste funny and he knew what to do. Then there is the widow and the oil that supplied money for the debt she owed. It is as “every day” as an ax head that gets lost, or the very surreal event of the enemy’s general coming for a visit.

Elisha isn’t intimidated. He doesn’t show favoritism. He hears from God and moves as God wants him to move.

Elisha wasn’t intimidated by Naaman, an enemy of Israel. He doesn’t refuse Naaman because he is the “enemy.” He hears God and lives to OBEY.

My heart is challenged. This week has been a week of prayer as I’ve examined this life of Elisha all over again.