Thoughts on Independence Day, Part 2

Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder. — GEORGE WASHINGTON

However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion. — GEORGE WASHINGTON

The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty. — JOHN ADAMS

Constitutions should consist only of general provisions; the reason is that they must necessarily be permanent, and that they cannot calculate for the possible change of things. — ALEXANDER HAMILTON

A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one. — ALEXANDER HAMILTON (NOTE: I really don’t like those “TWEET THIS” features, but in this case… TWEET THIS QUOTE!!!!)

The basis of our government being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. But I should mean that every man should receive those papers and be capable of reading them. — THOMAS JEFFERSON

“The year 1776, celebrated as the birth year of the nation and for the signing of the Declaration of Independence, was for those who carried the fight for independence forward a year of all-too-few victories, of sustained suffering, disease, hunger, desertion, cowardice, disillusionment, defeat, terrible discouragement, and fear, as they would never forget, but also of phenomenal courage and bedrock devotion to country, and that, too they would never forget.” ― David McCullough, 1776

 

 

Quotes for Independence Day — Part 1

I love American History. David McCullough’s book, The American Spirit, is breathing new hope into my heart this season. In the mockery of what is happening currently, his words are so refreshing. I also look to history and those who were part of shaping our nation. Those were days of hope and courage. I need those words again. 

Continue reading “Quotes for Independence Day — Part 1”

Great quotes from American presidents on President’s Day

No man has a good enough memory to be a successful liar. — Abraham Lincoln

All the rights secured to the citizens under the Constitution are worth nothing, and a mere bubble, except guaranteed to them by an independent and virtuous Judiciary.  — Andrew Jackson

The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office. — Dwight D. Eisenhower

The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. — Franklin D. Roosevelt

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. — George Washington

Sometimes I wake at night in the White House and rub my eyes and wonder if it is not all a dream.  — Grover Cleveland

I do not believe there is a problem in this country or the world today which could not be settled if approached through the teaching of the Sermon on the Mount. — Harry S Truman

Man cannot live by bread alone; he must have peanut butter. — James A. Garfield

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. — James Madison

It was by one Union that we achieved our independence and liberties, and by it alone can they be maintained. —  James Monroe

Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. — John Adams

The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were. — John F. Kennedy

Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure… than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat. — Theodore Roosevelt

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The prophetic voice of Frederick Douglass

While America is printing tracts and bibles; sending missionaries abroad to convert the heathen; expending her money in various ways for the promotion of the gospel in foreign lands—the slave not only lies forgotten, uncared for, but is trampled underfoot by the very churches of the land. What have we in America? Continue reading “The prophetic voice of Frederick Douglass”

Blessed Peacemakers

Blessed are the peacemakers,
    for they will be called children of God. (Matt. 5:9)

In a day when the boiler plate view of Muslims is “they just want to come over here and bomb us,” there is a fresh reminder that not all Muslims are that way. Most aren’t. Hard to believe. Just true.

Tunisia is one spot no one pays attention to, even though it was the first place the “Arab Spring” started. Egypt blew up. Libya blew up. Syria dug in their heels. But Tunisia kept plodding toward peace. They still make their way in a treacherous situation, but a group was recognized yesterday for their work in bringing peace and stability to their nation. 

“We are here to give hope to young people in Tunisia, that if we believe in our country, we can succeed,” said Ouided Bouchamaoui, president of The Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts, a group that’s part of the Quartet.

It’s interesting what can happen when the world isn’t watching… and criticizing.

How did we get “wedge issues?”

In American politics, we call them “wedge issues.” These days, it can be just about anything. But, generally, it’s throwing something out there for “discussion” that won’t get discussion because the person throwing it out knows everyone has a pre-fabricated response.

Gay Marriage
Racism
Poverty
Immigration
Abortion

Wedge issues.

When did we get “wedge issues?” 1970s, when Roe v. Wade was decided?

I would really invite all believers to read N.T. Wright’s challenging book Surprised by Scripture. (He takes on Christian wedge issues there, like women in ministry and more.) His last few chapters are challenging in regards to how we see the founding of the United States and how western Europe in general has been since the Enlightenment.

Wedge issues, in his view, didn’t start in the last few decades for Americans. They started from the founding. The “Enlightenment settlement”, as Wright calls it, allows for “Christian witness” in some arenas, but shuts it off in other arenas. The contract we signed? The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. His argument is the church is told to step back from public life and do its own thing in private.

Again, it comes from the Epicurean philosophy our founding Fathers, especially ones like Jefferson, followed: God exists, but he’s a long way off. The world will now get along under its own steam.

The church can “purchase its independence by colluding with the implied pagan philosophy.” So, people get their “private religion” and can practice as they choose, but leave the spirituality behind when the “big people” issues on how the system runs are discussed.

Then delivers this bomb:

I suspect that one of the reasons why the creation/evolution debate generates to much heat in America — far more than anywhere else — is that people can hear all the overtones, social, cultural, and political, that it throws off. The idea of God having anything to do with the ongoing process of the world flies in the face of all that Western culture has stood for — including Western Christian culture.

And this:

Have we fostered a culture in which the lordship and teachings of Jesus, for instance about poverty or human dignity or war, have been honored, studied, taught and practiced? Or have we been content — as so many Christians on both sides of the Atlantic have been content — to drift with this or that prevailing political wind, to trim our sails so that only one or two real distinctives are left, related perhaps to sexual and family life, only then to complain when the principalities and powers, having quietly gained our cooperation in other spheres, such as rampant individualism and the neoliberal vision of the good life that goes with it, now come to attack those last remaining strongholds?

Is it possible America didn’t “fall” with the Supreme Court decision about gay marriage, or Roe v. Wade, but the church abdicated some responsibility leading into the very founding of a nation we thought we could call “Christian?”

Honestly, read Wright’s book. It’s a LOT more to dive into than just this simple post!