When optimism doesn’t deal with depravity

“Optimistic American Christianity resists the notion that the human race, left to itself, will self-destruct. Although the can-do American spirit has taken some hard hits in the twenty-first century, and the future for our nation is not as bright as it was, our politics continue to exhibit a self-righteousness that partners well with religious self-righteousness on both the right and the left… Understanding Sin require us to recognize its power lodged in ourselves.” — Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion: Understanding the Death of Jesus Christ

Something is wrong and must be put right

“The tragedy of human existence, in fact, calls out for rectificationSomething is wrong and must be put right. When we feel that in our bones, when we admit that something is wrong not only with the whole human situation in general but also with one’s own self in particular, then God is at work bringing us closer to the cross of Christ.” — Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion: Understanding the Death of Jesus Christ

Why the horror of the crucifixion is needed

“In the final analysis, the crucifixion of Christ for the sin of he world reveals that it is not only the victims of oppression and injustice who are in need of God’s deliverance, but also the victimizers. Each of us is capable, under certain circumstances, of being a victimizer…

Continue reading “Why the horror of the crucifixion is needed”

Crucifixion of the Warrior God — Love Laid a Trap

Greg Boyd in his never-ending book, The Crucifixion of the Warrior God, lays out God’s martial arts program. (This won’t hook you enough to actually read the book, but I’m not going to go into any more detail than that because I would have to take three blog posts to explain it.) Continue reading “Crucifixion of the Warrior God — Love Laid a Trap”

Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross

Here is the thing with Greg Boyd’s two-volume behemoth titled The Crucifixion of the Warrior God : it is like the never-ending story. I get through a chapter, which is fairly amazing in and of itself, and I think, “Whew!” Then I’m wondering how much farther to go… and I swear more chapters magically appear at the end of the volume. I’m not kidding. It always looks like I’ve read 10 pages at the front of the second volume even if I’ve read 5 chapters. (And Boyd doesn’t do short chapters like most publishers and readers insist on!) I’ll never finish this book.  Continue reading “Understanding the “wrath” of God through the Cross”